Tuesday, 8 November 2011

Keeping cosy - hand-knitted throws

With the days and nights getting a tad cooler, it's the time of year to make use of all those  throws that have been knitted and crocheted. You could, of course, just turn up the central heating. But whether you don't want to do that because you're greener than that, or simply can't afford to, wrapping a throw/blanket around you, especially if you've made it yourself, is just the ticket.

Bed-sized throws

My Mum made this cotton one, using a kit from Women's Weekly (the magazine has just celebrated its 100th birthday). It's made from triangles that are sewn together to make squares, one they're done a border is added. She also has a single bed sized cotton throw that she uses downstairs, but this one is based on squares, knitted on the diagonal (see my pink throw below).


I made this throw, on our bed, from a dark brown aran weight wool that has felted slightly as it's been washed a couple of times. It's heavyish so doesn't move around the bed much and it is lovely and warm. It's also an easy one to make, as you can easily make it as big as you want. The basket weave effect is obtained by alternatively knitting and purling in squares. I knitted strips four squares wide, to the length that I wanted,  and then oversewed these together until I'd obtained the width that I wanted.

Keeping cosy elsewhere


This silvery grey throw is made in the same way as the brown one above, using grey aran weight wool, but it's more of a knee blanket size.

This pink throw has been made using the same pattern that my Mum used to make her single knitted throw, but it is made from aran weight wool, on bigger needles (obviously). The pattern is quite complicated, but when you have the hang of it it isn't too bad. Though I haven't managed to put it's border on yet, but that doesn't stop it being used to keep my tootsies warm!



This last throw is a sampler quilt made using a pattern from the Lion Brand Yarn website (there's lots of lovely free patterns on this site, you just need to sign-up). This one is also knitted in strips; two outside edge ones with a knitted edge (one left, one right), and two strips on the inside so that the different squares of stitches are alternated. Again this can be made to the size you want and has an lacy border added onto the top and bottom. This is a great throw for learning different stitches.

When I've got round to teaching myself how to crochet, I'll definitely be making myself a granny squares quilt.

Do you knit/crochet your own throws. What do you do to keep toasty?

TTFN
Louise.

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